Game of Thrones Inspired Dragon Egg Shortbread Cookies!

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In an attemp to get into the Christmas spirit after returning to Australia last night, I baked a batch of Christmas shortbread cookies with mother.

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Although appropriately we made a batch of Christmassy themed cookies, I was never one to settle for such mundane baked goods. Alongside this harbouring a great love for the ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ series, I instantly knew what must be done when I saw the packet of slithered almonds in the pantry.

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Alas here I present to you my prototype ‘A Song of Ice and Fire’ inspired dragon egg shortbread cookies.
Here is the dough prior to baking, the scales I created by painstakingly layering slithered almonds one by one.

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And here we have it, shortbread fitting for the khaleesi herself.
In the coming weeks I intend to try this recipe once again but with the addition of dying the almonds black and green to create the coloured eggs of Daeneyrs dragons Rhaegal and Drogon.

The basic shortbread recipe i used is as follows:

-250g butter, at room temperature
-100g (1/2 cup) caster sugar
-300g (2 cups) plain flour, sifted
-90g (1/2 cup) rice flour, sifted
-Slithered almonds (for decoration)

Process:
Step 1
Preheat oven to 150°C. Using an electric cream butter and sugar in a bowl.

Step 2
Gradually add flour, beating on low speed, once crumbly kneed dough with hands until firm. Dough is then transferred to a lightly floured surface and flattened to 2cm with a rolling pin.

Step 3
Using a medium sized bowl cut 15cm circles in the dough, then shape the sides into an egg’esq shape by slicing off some dough on the upper half of each side. Now you will make your dragon scales, push the slithered almonds into the dough lightly in rows alternating a centimetre to the side so they end up in the centre of almonds in the row preceding.

Step 4
Bake the shortbread in oven, swapping the trays halfway through cooking, for 40 minutes or until light golden. Set aside on the trays for 10 minutes to cool before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

Fire and Blood!

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Azuki Kinako Shortbread Cookies

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Always having been quite the avid baker, ever since arriving in Japan I have been experimenting with new Japanese flavours and ingredients I either was unable to acquire back home or had never even heard of!

Not just baking but cooking also, over the past 6 months my skills in the kitchen have gone from cooking the most basic of curries to basically anything that might take my fancy if I have the means to google a recipe.

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Here is the recipe to whip up a batch of Azuki 小豆 Kinako 黄粉 Shortbread Cookies that I baked.

Ingredients
1 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup kinako (roasted soybean flour)
2/3 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
250 grams unsalted butter
250 grams azuki (sweet red beans)

Method
1. Beat butter and sugar together on medium speed for about 3 minutes until fluffy with an electric mixer.
2. Fold flour, kinako, and salt into butter mixture, mixing only until it disappears into the dough. You don’t want to work the dough too much once the flour is added so use a wooden spoon.
3. Fold in azuki paste in a similar fashion.
3. Scoop mixture into a ziplock bag. Put the bag on a flat surface, using a rolling pin roll the dough into a half a cm thick rectangle. Once your done seal the bag, pressing out all the air and freeze for 30 minutes. You may keep the dough in this stage up to two days.
4. Preheat your oven to 170 degrees Celsius.
5. Put the plastic bag on a cutting board and slit it open, discard the bag and using a sharp knife, cut the dough into small rectangles or use a cookie cutter like I did (mine were hearts). Transfer the cookies to a baking sheets and carefully prick each one four times with a fork.
6. Bake for 15 to 16 minutes. Transfer the cookies to a rack to cool. This recipe makes about 20 cookies.

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Note that if you live outside if Japan/Korea/China kinako and azuki may be hard to come by, but even these can be made from scratch.

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Here’s the finished product, half I dusted with additional kinako flour and the the others served with sweetened Kabocha 南瓜 (Pumpkin) paste.